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Cap'n spices

By

Andrew Cherry
Cap'n spices

Project Type

Make-it-Yourself

Category

Homewares

Waste Materials

Wine Bottles

Hits

1,777
A range of spice shakers,Hand made,Eco friendly,Inspired by a life piracy...Waste glass says you? I feel a change in the wind says I!

Materials & Equipment List

Glass Wine, beer (Budweiser), or even rum bottles- Scrap wood (from old furniture or storage pallets)- Manual Glass cutter- Tea-light or other candle- large cup/ bucket of water- Lighter- Sand Paper (a variety), or sanding board- Hand held drill - Hot glue gun and Hot glue.- Permanent marker- Junior hacksaw - Protective goggles- Patience

Making Instructions (Login to see the full instructions)

Having chosen an appropriate glass bottle (I found Wine bottles worked best as the glass was thicker and less prone to shattering), score a fairly deep line around it with a handheld glass cutter. I used a cheap glass cutter (
This score line must now be heated. I found the most effective method was to spin the bottle slowly above a candle, watching the score line turn black as the glass heats up substantially. You may hear a few minor cracks when the glass is at the appropriate heat.Pro tip - make sure you have removed the lid when approaching this stage, or you will trap air inside the bottle and heat it, causing the bottle to explode! (learnt from first hand experience)
When the score line has reached the appropriate heat the bottle must be immediately plunged into cold water contained in a large cup or bucket. Submerging the bottle this way ensure the score line is cooled evenly and instantly. If you aren't already, this is a good time to put some safety goggles on, as the thinner bottles can sometimes shatter.
Upon removal of the bottle, pull lightly at the two ends until they 'pop' apart. DO NOT TWIST THE BOTTLE.A neat initial score line and careful heating of the score line will give best results and cleanest cut!
Sharp edges can be easily sanded down on a sanding board, or using sand paper. I used 80grit to sand down initial sharpness and then some finer wet&dry sand paper to get a good finish. This is also a good way to even out the edges and make the cut flat.
Now start on the wooden base.Using the cut glass as a guide, draw around the cut to make a circle on some scrap wood.Using a 50m (or large as possible) drill bit, begin to drill multiple holes until one final circular recess is left in the wood.
Using a Junior hacksaw (or saw of your choice) cut a circular edge a few millimetres away from the edge of the drill hole. This can be sanded down for a smooth finish and to make the base as circular as possible.
With the circular base complete, the cut glass can be slotted into the hole and glued into place. Hot glue works best as it also fills in any gaps if the cut is not clean!
Using the hand drill, drill holes (many for pepper, one for salt, larger holes for herbs etc) in the metal lids. These can then be screwed on.
Before assembly, the Glass can be Sandblasted or spray painted to add colour or texture to the spice shakers. This is open to preference.
Take a snazzy picture!
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Author Info

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Andrew Cherry

Nottingham

United Kingdom

Product Design BA(hons) at Nottingham Trent University. An active outdoors-man and a self-confessed hoarder....

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