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Ablaze

By

Abbey Sheffield
Ablaze

Project Type

Make-it-Yourself

Category

Lighting

Waste Materials

Food Cans (Lg)

Hits

1,153
I know carrier bags have been used and abused time and time again but I wanted to create something a little more special. There is always going to be a problem with an over population of carrier bags in domestic areas, most of which end up in waste. Now alone, carrier bags could make an endless amount of potential new products but I wanted to combine it with something that isnt necessarily seen often, in this case metal; and in particular, tin cans (the big ones). After endless practicing both on a smaller scale using coke cans and candles and larger industrial variations with diner sized baked bean tins and light bulbs, I have designed this simplistic waste product using current readily available factors (the stand and fittings of the lamp itself) and a combination of otherwise known waste items.

Materials & Equipment List

Large Food Tins, unlabeled and cleanedVarious Carrier Bags, preferably clear, branding cut offShop-bought Lamp, simplistic and bold in colourBulb, low energyAdhesive, environmentally friendlyMallet and PointDrill and Drill BitsDremmel and Diamond BladeCoarse Sandpaper and FileSpray Paint, White

Making Instructions (Login to see the full instructions)

The tin itself is the most difficult bit
Start to create dents in the window space for future drill holes using a hole punch and a mallet. Follow the grooves of the curves on the tin to ensure straight lines. Create a rectangle when doing this around the edge. Get a big drill bit, around the size of 8ml. Drill through the dents you created to enhance the window you
Next grab the dremmel, and add a diamond blade (you need the strength to cut through the metal). Follow the edge of the masking tape and the holes as a starting point to cut the whole rectangle out. You should find cutting the window out easier with the holes, again use the curves of the tin to make sure they
Once all this is done, peel off the masking tape. You should have a window now in your tin, it does now need to be filed down using coarse sandpaper to ensure a smooth line and remove potential harm.
Give the tin a wash with warm soapy water and dry off to remove the sticky excess or rust that could be there. From here, spray paint white. Give it a couple of coats and leave it to dry fully before even attempting to move it. I find a white gloss spray paint works best.
Now for the carrier bag internal filter, gather all or most of the carrier bags you have floating around. For this particular model use clear and white carrier bags.
Cut them into rectangular shapes, and avoid any branding on the bag itself. I only say this if you want block colours, you may want to create a speckled effect if you desire. Layer them up on a flat surface using a base layer of grease proof paper or a roll of plain paper.
Once you have made a rectangular shape (ish) place another layer of paper over the top. Then apply the iron on a medium to high heat.
Give it some time and constantly keep it moving over the layer sandwich. Over time the heat will melt the plastic and bond the layers together. The higher the heat the more intense the bind will be, sometimes creating solid patches rather than a translucent outcome.
For the second shade, a cardboard silhouette could be created at this stage and inserted. For this, draw a pattern onto card and cut out, spray paint white and place between two layers of carrier bags and iron and bond flat and together.
Buy a shop bought lamp, simplistic in design and colour and start to dismantle the shade. Peel/cut the actual shade off the wire frame and discard. The frame is what we need for the next stage. At this stage also buy a bulb and keep all the necessary features and pieces needed for the light to work.
Now, attach the filter shade to the internal side of the tins. Do this by using double sided sticky tape, not as messy as glue, and accurate in application and outcome. Lay a strip around the top and bottom of the tin and then apply the shade (once cut to size).
The last bit is to apply the internal frame that will hold the tin up as a shade on the light. Four dots of super glue will do the trick in four opposite corners. Once fixed and dry, attach the tin shade as you would a normal shade and turn the light on.
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Author Info

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Abbey Sheffield

Waltham Abbey

United Kingdom

Currently a second year BA(Hons) Product Design student at Nottingham Trent University. Design is my drive, art is my passion, craft is my hobby....

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